Monthly Archives: June 2015

Why We Love, Lust, and Live with Helen Fisher

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A leader in the psychology of human mating, and an expert on both the cultural and biological foundations of love, Helen Fisher shares science-backed information on attraction, mate selection, infidelity, the neuroscience of love and the effects of culture on our biology. There’s a wealth of interesting facts here and some surprising insight into humanity’s quest for romance. We LOVED this episode!

In this episode you will hear about:

  • Critical factors that influence love and attraction
  • The biological patterns of partner choice
  • Some of the major reasons behind the prevalence of infidelity
  • The neuroscience of love
  • How our brain’s architecture allows us to love more than one person at once
  • Why we refer to it as “falling” in love
  • How Bill Clinton was our first “female” president
  • Some psychological truths about our modern hookup culture
  • Four patterns of mate pairing
  • The role of fetishes
  • The genetic basis for stability in relationships
  • Sex differences in sexual/romantic rejection.
  • Helen’s experience as an identical twin and her opinions on nature vs. nurture
  • The role of culture in changing our biology
 

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“Helen Fisher, PhD Biological Anthropologist, is a Senior Research Fellow, The Kinsey Institute, member of the Center for Human Evolutionary Studies in the Department of Anthropology, Rutgers University and Chief Scientific Advisor to the Internet dating site Match.com. She has conducted extensive research and written five books on the evolution and future of human sex, love, marriage, gender differences in the brain and how your personality style shapes who you are and who you love.” -Blurb taken from helenfisher.com

Straight Talk about IQ with Christopher Chabris

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In this episode we cover every topic in psychology, neuroscience and genetics (not literally, but it certainly feels that way)! Christopher Chabris shares his expert opinions on science journalism, general intelligence, IQ testing, intuition, creativity, the default mode brain network and more. We really nerd out here – science types will get a kick out of this in depth discussion.

In this episode you will hear about:

  • The inner workings of science journalism
  • The heritability of IQ
  • What IQ tends to predict
  • Our culture’s widespread misconception that IQ is all important
  • The problem of false positives when correlating genes with personality traits
  • The Mozart effect
  • The Flynn effect
  • Debunking the 10,000 hour principle
  • Chess champion Bobby Fisher’s schizophrenic tendencies
  • Scott’s work as Scientific Director of the Imagination Institute at UPenn
  • The relationship between imagination, general intelligence and creativity
  • The functions of the default mode network/executive attention network
  • Divorcing IQ from “smartness” and “stupid”
 

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“Christopher Chabris is Associate Professor of Psychology and co-director of the Neuroscience Program at Union College, where he studies intelligence, thinking, and decision-making. He received his Ph.D. in psychology and A.B. in computer science from Harvard University. Chris is the co-author of the New York Times bestseller The Invisible Gorilla, and Other Ways Our Intuitions Deceive Us, which has been published in 17 languages to date. He shared the 2004 Ig Nobel Prize in Psychology (awarded for “achievements that first make people laugh, and then make them think”), given for the experiment that inspired the book. Chris has spoken to audiences at major conferences and businesses, including Google, PopTech, and Procter & Gamble, and his work has been published in leading journals including Science, Nature, Perception, and Cognitive Science. He is also a chess master, a poker amateur, and a contributor to The New York Times, The Wall Street Journal, and other national publications.” -Blurb taken from Chabris.com