Monthly Archives: July 2015

Understanding the science of introversion and extraversion with Dr. Luke Smillie

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We have Dr. Luke Smillie on the podcast to elucidate the research and conceptualizations surrounding introversion and extraversion. Topics include psychometrics, well-being, cultural values, the neurochemistry of personality traits, nature vs. nurture and much more. With this episode we wanted to clear up controversy and delve deep into this hot topic to help the listener get the lay of the land. We hope you enjoy!

In this episode you will hear about:

  • The many conceptualizations of introversion & extraversion
  • How to spot an extravert and/or know if you are one
  • Ambiversion and how people are not always extraverted or always introverted
  • Relations of narcissism, agreeableness, neuroticism etc. with introversion & extraversion
  • How psychological surveys work
  • How personality is simply your habits of behavior on average
  • How a person can change their personality by changing their habits
  • Differences in cultural valuation of introversion vs. extraversion
  • Introversion as it relates to social intelligence
  • The autism spectrum quotient and introversion
  • Extraversion and wellbeing
  • Reward sensitivity as it relates to extra/introversion
  • The pros and cons of different personality traits
  • Nature and nurture of extra/introversion
  • The future of research in the field
 

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Resources: 

Luke is a personality psychologist. His research interests broadly relate to the causes and consequences of major personality traits. Much of his work concerns the relation that personality has to emotion/motivation, with a large proportion of this work focusing on the trait domain called Extraversion. He is also interested in testing and refining theories concerning biological mechanisms that may underlie personality differences (including those that mediate the effects of social/environmental influences on personality), and in neuroscience paradigms that can serve this goal. -Blurb taken from unimelb.edu

Hope, the Future and Flourishing with Shane Lopez

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One of the world’s foremost experts on hope, self-proclaimed “hopemonger” Shane Lopez, sheds light on the incredible impact hope can have in our lives. We chat about flourishing, narratives of our future, passion and how hope may predict job and school success. There are some compelling statistics here that we hope will get you focused on cultivating… more hope!

In this episode you will hear about:

  • How intelligence may only account for ¼ of the variance of our success in life
  • How hope is worth a whole letter grade in school and a day of productivity on the job
  • Hope, happiness and health
  • Deconstructing the hope construct
  • Goals/pathways/agency
  • Hope grit and self-determination
  • How creating your passion is better than following your passion
  • How past performance is not the only predictor for the future
  • How strengths and passion can be a better indicator of success then GRE scores
  • Hope interventions in school and in your life
  • How our vision for our future shapes our present
 

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Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

Resources: 

“Shane J. Lopez, Ph.D., is the world’s leading researcher on hope. His mission is to help people of all ages exercise some control over what their future can become and to teach them how to aim for the future they want in school, work and life. He is also one of the most vocal advocates of psychological reform of America’s education system. He helps schools function less like impersonal factories and more like dynamic human development centers that help students achieve the meaningful futures they say they really want – including a good job and a happy family.” -Blurb taken from shanelopez.com