Monthly Archives: June 2016

The Ego is the Enemy with Ryan Holiday

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

On this episode of The Psychology Podcast, we interview bestselling author Ryan Holiday about the timeless life-advice he gleaned from researching his latest book: Ego Is The Enemy. Ryan shares insights from great individuals that eschewed the spotlight to put their higher goals above their desires for recognition. We talk about the importance of talking less and doing more. Our conversation covers the human drive to live a meaningful life and the dramatic shifts in worldview that takes place when astronauts view earth from outer space. We discuss the well-being benefits of integrating behavior with personal values and we commiserate over feeling existentially compelled to squeeze every last drop of productivity from each moment. It’s an interesting look at the foibles of egoism; anyone interested in contemplating what it means to live a good life would do well to give this episode a listen. Enjoy the show!

 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

“RYAN HOLIDAY is a strategist and writer. He dropped out of college at nineteen to apprentice under Robert Greene, author of The 48 Laws of Power, and later served as the director of marketing for American Apparel. His company, Brass Check, has advised clients like Google, TASER, and Complex, as well as many prominent bestselling authors. Holiday has written four previous books, most recently The Obstacle Is the Way, which has been translated into seventeen languages and has a cult following among NFL coaches, world-class athletes, TV personalities, political leaders, and others around the world. He lives on a small ranch outside Austin, Texas.” –Blurb taken from http://www.amazon.com

Cal Newport on Deep Work

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
On this episode of The Psychology Podcast, we feature a particularly lively exchange, as Scott and Cal attempt to decode the patterns of success, sharing their perspectives on deep work, deliberate practice, grit, creativity, talent, mastery, IQ, and cultural misconceptions about passion and finding one’s calling. The discussion has a fun and curious tone; it is a research-informed exploration of what it really takes to succeed in the 21st century. We had a great time recording this episode and we think you will really enjoy it.
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

“Cal Newport is a writer and a professor of computer science at Georgetown University. He is the author of five books and runs the popular advice blog, Study Hacks, which attempts to decode “patterns of success” in both school and the working world. His contrarian ideas on building a successful, meaningful life have been featured on TV, radio, and in many major publications, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and New York Post.” -Blurb taken from Amazon.com

Paul Tough on Helping Children Succeed in School and in Life

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

We are happy  to welcome journalist and author Paul Tough on the show to discuss how we can help children from adverse backgrounds flourish. Paul began his deep dive into this topic 13 years ago for a New York Times piece, and he has been fascinated with the neuroscientific, psychological, political and sociological research ever since. This episode is a look at practical recommendations for how children can transcend difficult circumstances and cultivate well-being. We cover some of the challenges facing impoverished children and the effects of these environments on how children develop. We discuss constructs like grit, conscientiousness, character strengths, and “non-cognitive capacities”. We ask important philosophical questions like “are the skills associated with doing well in school really the same as doing well in life?” We look at how pursuing well-being can actually fuel academic success, the importance of creativity and autonomy in school, and much more!

 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

You can read “Helping Children Succeed” in its entirety for free here.

“Paul Tough is the author, most recently, of Helping Children Succeed: What Works and Why. He is also the author of How Children Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, and the Hidden Power of Character and Whatever It Takes: Geoffrey Canada’s Quest to Change Harlem and America. He is a contributing writer to the New York Times Magazine and a speaker on various topics including education, poverty, parenting, and politics.  His writing has also appeared in theNew Yorker, the AtlanticGQ, and Esquire.” Blurb taken from paultough.com