Emma Seppala of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education 

Dr. Emma Seppälä on How Happiness Can Accelerate Your Success

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“Success is liking yourself, liking what you do, and liking how you do it.” — Maya Angelou

Dr. Emma Seppälä is a true friend of the show and we’re thrilled to speak with her about her new book, The Happiness Track. In this episode, we provide data-driven insight into how our overextension is hindering our success, and how cultivating happiness can actually drive our achievement. The research shows that we needn’t be chronically over-scheduled and over-caffeinated to achieve our goals. Pursuing things like meaningful relationships, gratitude and self-compassion can actually be more conducive to success. We cover some fascinating studies and offer practical thoughts on enhancing well-being and innovation. We think you’ll really enjoy the dialogue.

 

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“EMMA SEPPÄLÄ is Science Director of the Center for Compassion and Altruism Research and Education at Stanford University and a leading expert on health psychology, well-being, and resilience. Her research has been featured in the New York Times, ABC News, Forbes, the Boston Globe, U.S. News & World Report, the Huffington Post, INC, and Fast Company. She is founder of the popular online magazine Fulfillment Daily and a frequent contributor to Psychology Today, Harvard Business Review, and the Huffington Post. Her writing has also appeared in the Washington Post, Scientific American Mind, and Spirituality & Health. Seppälä consults for Fortune 500 leaders on building positive organizations. A sought-after speaker, she has addressed academic, corporate, and governmental institutions, including Google, the National Science Foundation, and the World Bank. She holds an undergraduate degree in comparative literature from Yale University, a master’s degree in East Asian languages and cultures from Columbia University, and a PhD in psychology from Stanford University.” Blurb taken from amazon.com