Tag Archives: creativity

Brené Brown on Creativity, Courageous Vulnerability and Wholehearted Living

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

We are especially grateful (and giddy) to be sharing this episode with our listeners! Brene Brown’s work really gels with our core interests here on The Psychology Podcast, and the resulting conversation contains some enthusiastic and empirically informed banter that is sure to inform and delight. We geek out over some counter-intuitive findings, like how incredibly compassionate people have a tendency to set the most boundaries and say “no.” We discuss the power of being vulnerable and how the data suggests that it is one of the best predictors of courage. We chat about how trying to be cool is the enemy of truly being cool, how we can enrich future generation’s learning with wholehearted living, and how ignoring our creativity defies our essential nature. It’s ~45 minutes of two experts in the field sharing data, and themselves, and it’s one of our favorite episodes yet.

http://survey.libsyn.com/psychologypodcast (Email is not required).

Thank you!

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

We’re making a real effort to improve the show for our listeners and would hugely appreciate 15 seconds of your time filling out this short survey: http://survey.libsyn.com/psychologypodcast (Email is not required).

“Dr. Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston Graduate College of Social Work. She has spent the past twelve years studying vulnerability, courage, worthiness, and shame. Her groundbreaking research has been featured on PBS, NPR, CNN, The Washington Post, and The New York Times. Brené’s 2010 TEDxHouston talk, The Power of Vulnerability, is one of the top ten most viewed TED talks on TED.com, with approximately 6 million viewers. Additionally, Brené gave the closing talk at the 2012 TED conference where she talked about shame, courage, and innovation. Brené’s newest book is, Daring Greatly: How the Courage to Be Vulnerable Transforms the way we Live, Love, Parent, and Lead (Gotham, 2012). She is also the author of The Gifts of Imperfection (2010), and I Thought It Was Just Me (2007), and Connections (2009); a shame-resilience curriculum being facilitated by helping professionals across the globe.” Blurb taken from amazon.com

Cal Newport on Deep Work

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn
On this episode of The Psychology Podcast, we feature a particularly lively exchange, as Scott and Cal attempt to decode the patterns of success, sharing their perspectives on deep work, deliberate practice, grit, creativity, talent, mastery, IQ, and cultural misconceptions about passion and finding one’s calling. The discussion has a fun and curious tone; it is a research-informed exploration of what it really takes to succeed in the 21st century. We had a great time recording this episode and we think you will really enjoy it.
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

“Cal Newport is a writer and a professor of computer science at Georgetown University. He is the author of five books and runs the popular advice blog, Study Hacks, which attempts to decode “patterns of success” in both school and the working world. His contrarian ideas on building a successful, meaningful life have been featured on TV, radio, and in many major publications, including the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Washington Post, and New York Post.” -Blurb taken from Amazon.com

Dr. Mark Bertin on Understanding and Supporting People with ADHD

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Statistically speaking, many of us know someone or even experience some of the difficulties associated with ADHD, but what are the essential characteristics of this often misunderstood phenomenon? On this episode of the Psychology Podcast, we gain a contemporary understanding of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder from an expert in the field, Dr. Mark Bertin. Dr. Bertin has a great deal of experience working with individuals and families living with ADHD. We discuss the diagnosis as it relates to creativity, information management, executive function impairment, stress, mindfulness and more. There’s a great deal of practical advice here for those looking to understand and support people with ADHD.

 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)
Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

“Dr. Mark Bertin, a board certified developmental behavioral pediatrician, studied at Cornell University and the UCLA School of Medicine before completing general pediatric training at Oakland Children’s Hospital in California. He is a frequent lecturer for parents, teachers and professionals on topics related to child development including autistic spectrum disorders, ADHD, parenting and mindfulness. Dr. Bertin also leads mindfulness classes, having attended trainings at Jon Kabat Zinn’s Center for Mindfulness in Medicine among others, and he incorporates mindfulness into sessions on an individual basis for interested families. Dr. Bertin’s books The Family ADHD Solution and Mindful Parenting for ADHD integrate mindfulness into evidence-based ADHD care, and he is a contributing author for the textbook Teaching Mindfulness Skills to Kids and Teens.” Blurb taken from Dr. Bertin’s website

image credit: mindful.org

Hope, the Future and Flourishing with Shane Lopez

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

One of the world’s foremost experts on hope, self-proclaimed “hopemonger” Shane Lopez, sheds light on the incredible impact hope can have in our lives. We chat about flourishing, narratives of our future, passion and how hope may predict job and school success. There are some compelling statistics here that we hope will get you focused on cultivating… more hope!

In this episode you will hear about:

  • How intelligence may only account for ¼ of the variance of our success in life
  • How hope is worth a whole letter grade in school and a day of productivity on the job
  • Hope, happiness and health
  • Deconstructing the hope construct
  • Goals/pathways/agency
  • Hope grit and self-determination
  • How creating your passion is better than following your passion
  • How past performance is not the only predictor for the future
  • How strengths and passion can be a better indicator of success then GRE scores
  • Hope interventions in school and in your life
  • How our vision for our future shapes our present
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

Resources: 

“Shane J. Lopez, Ph.D., is the world’s leading researcher on hope. His mission is to help people of all ages exercise some control over what their future can become and to teach them how to aim for the future they want in school, work and life. He is also one of the most vocal advocates of psychological reform of America’s education system. He helps schools function less like impersonal factories and more like dynamic human development centers that help students achieve the meaningful futures they say they really want – including a good job and a happy family.” -Blurb taken from shanelopez.com

 

Tim Ferriss on accelerated learning, peak performance and living the good life

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Three time bestselling author and human guinea pig Tim Ferriss discusses how to become top 5% in the world with a new skill in just 6-12 months. Scott and Tim debunk the 10,000 hour rule, discuss general principles for accelerated skill acquisition, consider what it means to live the good life and take a sneak peak at Tim’s new show The Tim Ferris Experiment.

In this episode you will hear about:

  • How super human results only require the right set of questions and a better toolkit
  • How an intelligent approach can cut skill acquisition down from years to months
  • Determining the right person to emulate when learning new skills
  • Questioning assumptions and practices that are taken for granted as “the best”
  • The importance of considering outliers
  • Using “micro” exercises to teach powerful “macro” principles
  • Some common mindset blocks that keep people from optimal skill development
  • Tim’s exercises to keep things in perspective and improve well-being
  • Tony Robbins’ advice to Tim about noticing the small things
  • Balancing appreciation vs. ambition
  • Tim’s philosophy of what it means to live the good life
  • Tim’s recommendations for getting started with meditation
  • Tim’s thoughts on the education system and how he’s gotten involved
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

Resources: 

“Timothy Ferriss is a serial entrepreneur, #1 New York Times bestselling author, and angel investor/advisor (Facebook, Twitter, Evernote, Uber, and 20+ more). Best known for his rapid-learning techniques, Tim’s books — The 4-Hour Workweek, The 4-Hour Body, and The 4-Hour Chef — have been published in 30+ languages. His popular blog http://www.fourhourblog.com has 1M+ monthly readers…” Blurb taken from Amazon.com

Ryan Holiday on Stoicism, strategy and creativity

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Best selling author Ryan Holiday discusses how Stoicism can help us transform trials into triumph. It’s a pragmatic episode, full of strategies to invert obstacles and wrest opportunity from adversity. The conversation includes invaluable advice for aspiring creatives, research affirming the Stoic approach, how great historical figures have used Stoicism and more…

In this episode you will hear about:

  • The intersections of Stoicism, creativity and positive psychological research
  • Ryan’s alternative track to success and the importance of mentorship
  • How Steve Jobs employed Stoicism
  • The importance of understanding reality objectively
  • How blessings and burdens needn’t be mutually exclusive
  • Passion vs. purpose
  • How modern psychology is affirming the truths of timeless philosophy
  • Psych research that could help creative professionals
  • The effects of meditation on creative output
  • The high ROI habits that help Ryan’s creativity
  • “Contemptuous expressions” and stripping things of the legends that encrust them
  • Scott and Ryan’s views on the importance of living as your authentic self
  • Harmonious passions
  • The importance as a writer of having something valuable to say
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

Resources: 

“Ryan Holiday is a media strategist and prominent writer on strategy and business. After dropping out of college at nineteen to apprentice under Robert Greene, author of The 48 Laws of Power, he went on to advise many bestselling authors and multiplatinum musicians. He served as director of marketing at American Apparel for many years, where his campaigns have been used as case studies by Twitter, YouTube, and Google and written about in AdAge, the New York Times, and Fast Company.” –Blurb taken from Ryan’s blog

Peter Sims on how “little bets” spur big creative successes

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

Award-winning author Peter Sims shares some heartening research on how people like Steve Jobs, Chris Rock and Frank Gehry use small experiments to lay the groundwork for big creative successes. It’s an encouraging episode for all the creative types out there thinking they have to have it all figured it out from the get go. Also, Scott and Peter banter across a wide spectrum of topics including improving education, the empathy deficit in America, deliberate practice and the importance of marching to the beat of your own drummer.

In this episode you will hear about:

  • How big name creatives use small scale experiments to find and improve ideas
  • The many benefits of being a black sheep
  • The philosophical frameworks big companies use to innovate
  • The vital importance of deliberate practice and forming a growth mindset
  • How creative success requires the ability to persist through failure
  • Developing healthy life expectations: you don’t have to have it all!
  • Pixar’s “Plusing” technique to craft their beloved film plots
  • The Darwinian model of creativity
  • The drive to be unique vs. the drive to belong
  • Crafting a social group that cultivates your desired attributes
  • A most heroic undertaking: to be yourself in a homogenized world
  • The practical ability to teach yourself new skills
  • Peter’s thoughts on measuring creativity and creativity in different fields
 

| Open Player in New Window

Click to download the episode directly (right click, then click save as)

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.

Resources: 

“Peter Sims is a best-selling author, co-founder of The Silicon Guild, and founder of The BLK SHP (“black sheep”) Foundation. His latest book is Little Bets: How Breakthrough Ideas Emerge from Small Discoveries, which grew out of a long collaboration with faculty at Stanford’s Institute of Design (the d.school), as well as his previous work in venture capital. He was also the coauthor with Bill George of the best-seller True North: Discover Your Authentic Leadership, a member of General Electric’s Innovation Advisory Panel, an Innosight Fellow, and the co-founder of Fuse Corps, a social venture that places entrepreneurial leaders on year-long grassroots projects with mayors to tackle some of America’s most pressing problems.” –Blurb taken from Amazon.com

Introducing The Psychology Podcast with Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman

Email this to someoneShare on Google+Share on FacebookPin on PinterestTweet about this on TwitterShare on LinkedIn

It’s my great pleasure to introduce The Psychology Podcast with Dr. Scott Barry Kaufman, where we give you insights into the mind, brain, behavior and creativity. Each episode will feature a guest who will stimulate your mind, and give you a greater understanding of your self, others, and the world we live in. Hopefully, we’ll also provide a glimpse into human possibility!

Why this podcast? Well, I really enjoy talking to interesting and creative people, learning from people, and debating and discussing different perspectives. What better way to do that then have a regular podcast where I get to share the fruits with others? Also, I feel like there are SO MANY podcasts that keep featuring the same guests over and over again, when there are so many awesome people out there doing work in psychology who rarely get appreciated or noticed. Sure, I’ll be having some of the more well known guests on my show. But I will also be featuring lots of folks who deserve a voice.

HUGE thanks to Elisheva Schwartz for encouraging me to go ahead and do a podcast already, Jane Reznik and Taylor Kreiss for their support and feedback, and Jerome Avendano for his editing.

Thanks for listening and enjoy the podcast.

Subscribe to the podcast on iTunes.
Subscribe to the podcast on Stitcher.
Follow on twitter.
Like on Facebook.